Silicon Minds: Bruce Perens and the Origins of Open Source

May 29th, 2012 |
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Silicon Minds: Open source continues to make gains despite the perception that its era has passed. Just recently, the NYSE Technologies announced it was using the open source software called Drupal to make collaboration tools and for content management, an important strategic move for the NYSE which is looking to strengthen global partnerships.

The Open Source Definition is one of the powerful ideas in the history of computing. As Bruce Perens contributed in Open Sources: Voices from the Open Source Revolution, “The Open Source Definition is a bill of rights for the computer user. It defines certain rights that a software license must grant you to be certified as Open Source. Those who don’t make their programs Open Source are finding it difficult to compete with those who do, as users gain a new appreciation of rights they always should have had. Programs like the Linux operating system and Netscape’s web browser have become extremely popular, displacing other software that has more restrictive licenses.”

It was 1999 when Perens wrote that. Since then, the concept of open source has unleashed untold collaboration and creativity in the global software community. On this Silicon Minds episode Perens talks about his career, the importance of sharing, and the possibilities of bringing the idea of open source to hardware.

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Posted in: Audio Podcast, Editorial, Silicon Minds