Cisco’s James Richardson – What Web 2.0 means for the Enterprise

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In this Thought Leaders podcast brought to you by SAVVIS, James Richardson, senior vice president at Cisco discusses how Cisco is helping enterprise CIOs prepare for the Web 2.0 world. He also sheds some light on Services Oriented Network Architecture (SONA) and its value for the Enterprise and the role virtualization plays in the Web 2.0 world.

Transcript:

Host: Editor – PodTech

Guest: James Richardson – Cisco

Editor – PodTech

Welcome to this special edition of Thought Leaders, coming to you from the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Half Moon Bay, California where we are attending an invitational event sponsored by SAVVIS called “Web 2.0 for the Enterprise Child’s Play or Power Play.” Over 100 business and technology leaders are here today to listen to a series of speakers talk about the impact that Web 2.0 applications may or may not have on enterprise IT systems and operations. One of those speakers was James Richardson, Senior Vice President of Cisco, who joins us today on Thought Leaders. Thanks for being here.

James Richardson – Cisco

Pleasure to be here. Thanks for having me.

Editor – PodTech

So, tell us how is Cisco helping enterprise CIOs prepare for the Web 2.0 world?

James Richardson – Cisco

Well we define the Web 2.0 world as creating new sort of capabilities in the Internet that are based on standard protocols and those standards to protocols are redefining how the network is going to interact with applications in the enterprise and we’re calling that “Enterprise 2.0.” So, in Enterprise 2.0 to achieve consistent performance, a little delay, a little latency of the applications we have to take a very prescriptive architectural approach, whether it’d be in the data center, whether it’d be in the network, whether it’d be in campus or for a remote worker or somebody, who is toggling over a mobile phone. We’ve come up with a suite of blue prints and an overall overwriting architecture called “SONA” Services Oriented Network Architecture that allows the CIO to build a road map of how they’re going to get to enterprise 2.0.

Editor – PodTech

Well, let’s talk a little bit about SONA and SOA because some of us — we start to get buried in too many acronyms here and yet I know they’re all important to the Web 2.0 world. Can you go into a little bit more detail about what’s SONA is all about and the value it can deliver it to an enterprise IT shop?

James Richardson – Cisco

Well, where the world is going and I think Web 2.0 is an example of that it’s the suite of standardized technologies that provides for mass collaboration, mass customization of applications and SOA defines that or Service Oriented Architecture defines that for application programmers in the enterprise. Where are we going, what are the standards suite of protocols that we’re going be utilizing to automate the next generation of applications. SONA is the network prescription for the deployment of Service Oriented Architectures “SONA.”

So, we believe that you to have standardize on a suite of services that will interact with the applications and they have to be delivered securely, anywhere, anytime with presence from the network and so SONA is there to define how you enable Service Oriented Architecture applications on top of the network.

Editor – PodTech

One last question, you talked a lot about virtualization in your presentation, virtualization of the network, of the data center and even of the application. How does virtualization play in this Web 2.0 world?

James Richardson – Cisco

Virtualization is very, very important, I think that the Web 2.0 movement defines a certain set of commoditization of how we do things and the infrastructure has to become more efficient and effective. There are protocols that we can automate from a network perspective that allows you to improve the utilization rate of your servers improve the utilization rate of your memory, of your storage or improve utilization of your applications and the concept of virtualization is allowing many access to one instance.

Alright, as opposed to having many access, many have many access one — I just want to virtualize access to that “one” and the network can provide a platform where you can virtualize access to a compute pool, to a storage pool, to an application interface. So, that you can deploy applications anywhere, anytime, anyplace.

Editor – PodTech

Well, thank you James very much for being on Thought Leaders today.

James Richardson – Cisco

Alright, my pleasure of being here with you.

Editor – PodTech

Thank you for watching.

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  1. March 13th, 2007 at 20:52 | #1

    the novice-like characteristics that some still present to video “acting” continues to surprise me being in such a media based world

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